Getty Images
Now playing
03:45
Trump on shutdown: This will go on for a while
President Joe Biden speaks about reaching 300 million COVID-19 vaccination shots, in the State Dining Room of the White House, Friday, June 18, 2021, in Washington.
Evan Vucci/AP
President Joe Biden speaks about reaching 300 million COVID-19 vaccination shots, in the State Dining Room of the White House, Friday, June 18, 2021, in Washington.
Now playing
01:31
'A private matter': Biden on US Catholic bishops' potential rebuke
Critical Race Theory
KSDK
Critical Race Theory
Now playing
04:39
Mom gets emotional during heated forum on critical race theory
FILE - This June 8, 2021 file photo shows the Supreme Court building in Washington. A Thursday, June 17, 2021 Supreme Court ruling that favored Catholic Social Services in Philadelphia was far from the constitutional gale wind that would have reshaped how courts interpret religious liberty under the First Amendment. Governmental entities are now on notice that if they want to ban discrimination against LGBTQ persons or anyone else, they had better not allow for any exceptions -- or else religious groups will have the right to ask for them, and they'll have a strong case for getting them. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
J. Scott Applewhite/AP
FILE - This June 8, 2021 file photo shows the Supreme Court building in Washington. A Thursday, June 17, 2021 Supreme Court ruling that favored Catholic Social Services in Philadelphia was far from the constitutional gale wind that would have reshaped how courts interpret religious liberty under the First Amendment. Governmental entities are now on notice that if they want to ban discrimination against LGBTQ persons or anyone else, they had better not allow for any exceptions -- or else religious groups will have the right to ask for them, and they'll have a strong case for getting them. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Now playing
03:32
Obamacare has survived over 2,000 attempts to kill it
mike pence heckled at conservative conference vpx _00000918.png
CNN
mike pence heckled at conservative conference vpx _00000918.png
Now playing
02:21
Mike Pence heckled at conservative conference
This Morning
Now playing
03:22
Ted Cruz: Critical race theory is as racist as Klansmen
YouTube/Department of Justice
Now playing
03:56
New video shows police getting punched during Capitol riot
CNN
Now playing
03:55
See grandmother's priceless reaction after Juneteenth bill passes
US President Donald Trump speaks during a "Make America Great Again" rally at the Eastern Kentucky University, in Richmond, Kentucky, on October 13, 2018. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP)        (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images)
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
US President Donald Trump speaks during a "Make America Great Again" rally at the Eastern Kentucky University, in Richmond, Kentucky, on October 13, 2018. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
04:19
Haberman: This underscored for Trump that he's not president
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 29: Fox News host Tucker Carlson discusses 'Populism and the Right' during the National Review Institute's Ideas Summit at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel March 29, 2019 in Washington, DC. Carlson talked about a large variety of topics including dropping testosterone levels, increasing rates of suicide, unemployment, drug addiction and social hierarchy at the summit, which had the theme 'The Case for the American Experiment.'  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 29: Fox News host Tucker Carlson discusses 'Populism and the Right' during the National Review Institute's Ideas Summit at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel March 29, 2019 in Washington, DC. Carlson talked about a large variety of topics including dropping testosterone levels, increasing rates of suicide, unemployment, drug addiction and social hierarchy at the summit, which had the theme 'The Case for the American Experiment.' (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:48
Carlson promotes conspiracy that FBI planned Capitol riot
CNN
Now playing
02:55
Abrams says she is open to Manchin's voting rights legislation
CNN
Now playing
01:56
Toobin: Huge victory for Obamacare, but fight isn't over
Split Fanone Clyde
CNN/Pool
Split Fanone Clyde
Now playing
04:26
DC officer Fanone recalls interaction with GOP Rep.: He ran away 'like a coward'
President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin, arrive to meet at the 'Villa la Grange', Wednesday, June 16, 2021, in Geneva, Switzerland.
Patrick Semansky/AP
President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin, arrive to meet at the 'Villa la Grange', Wednesday, June 16, 2021, in Geneva, Switzerland.
Now playing
02:58
Biden and Putin hold first face-to-face meetings
Now playing
03:40
Arizona voting data taken to so-called 'lab' in remote Montana
President Joe Biden speaks to the news media following a news conference after meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Wednesday, June 16, 2021, in Geneva, Switzerland.
Patrick Semansky/AP
President Joe Biden speaks to the news media following a news conference after meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Wednesday, June 16, 2021, in Geneva, Switzerland.
Now playing
03:45
Biden apologizes for firing back at CNN's Kaitlan Collins after question
CNN —  

President Donald Trump made a concession to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi late Wednesday, agreeing to not give a State of the Union address until after the government shutdown standoff has ended.

“As the Shutdown was going on, Nancy Pelosi asked me to give the State of the Union Address. I agreed. She then changed her mind because of the Shutdown, suggesting a later date. This is her prerogative - I will do the Address when the Shutdown is over,” Trump said in a tweet Wednesday.

“I am not looking for an … alternative venue for the SOTU Address because there is no venue that can compete with the history, tradition and importance of the House Chamber. I look forward to giving a ‘great’ State of the Union Address in the near future!”

Trump’s decision to abide by Pelosi’s decision earlier in the day to disinvite him from giving the speech to a joint session of Congress in the House chamber is the first time one of the principal players in the standoff saga has blinked. Trump and Pelosi have been at loggerheads for more than 33 days as the speaker and the President both refuse to budge on shutdown negotiations – Trump is demanding more than $5 billion for his wall along the southern border and Pelosi is refusing to give him a cent.

Pelosi reacted to Trump’s decision by hoping he would back a House-passed bill to reopen the parts of the government shuttered for more than a month.

“Mr. President, I hope by saying ‘near future’ you mean you will support the House-passed package to #EndTheShutdown that the Senate will vote on tomorrow,” Pelosi said on Twitter. “Please accept this proposal so we can re-open government, repay our federal workers and then negotiate our differences.”

WH caught off-guard

Earlier in the day, the California Democrat formally disinvited Trump from giving the address from the House chamber, catching White House officials off guard and leaving them scrambling for a response.

White House officials had believed Pelosi wanted only to postpone Trump’s State of the Union for political reasons after she sent a letter to him last week asking him to delay the address until after the partial government shutdown ended.

The plan from administration officials was to call her bluff by pressing forward with plans to deliver the speech, including a new letter on Wednesday that they hoped would force her hand. In that letter, Trump said he was planning on coming to the House chamber to deliver his address on Tuesday as planned, as he had been assured by Secret Service and Department of Homeland Security officials that there would be no problem providing security for the speech. Pelosi had initially cited security concerns as a reason to delay the speech.

RELATED: Pelosi denies Trump use of House chamber for State of the Union

They were left considering possible alternatives before Trump scuttled the idea in his Wednesday night tweet. White House officials were hesitant to hold a campaign-style rally because they thought it wasn’t formal enough to look like the traditional speech. Officials also recognized that it’s harder to keep Trump on message during a rally, where he often feeds off the crowd, versus a more formal address. Officials noted that television networks rarely carry the rallies live.

The message Trump planned to deliver at the Capitol – even one shaped around the shutdown – would be much more tamped down than the President’s usual rhetoric at a rally, where he often deviates from the script and works off the crowd.

It would also include other topic areas, like the economy and foreign policy, that might be hard to include in a speech on the border or in a political venue. And officials believe they have a positive message on both of those areas that they want to break through.

Some officials believed a rally would be seen as just another campaign speech, which they acknowledge people have started to tune out.

Trump always desired House chamber

03:42 - Source: CNN
Erin Burnett: The state of the union is not strong

Trump’s top preference for a venue – even after Pelosi revoked her invitation – was always to deliver the speech in the House chamber, a senior White House official said.

The White House floated the idea of holding a rally outside Washington, but not seriously, according to one official. Other venues floated – including at the southern border or Independence Hall in Philadelphia – posed several logistical and optics problems, White House officials said, and Trump wasn’t keen on delivering a State of the Union address to a largely Republican audience.

Officials also looked again at the Oval Office and at other venues in the White House. The Oval Office was a tough sell for the President, since he disliked the last address he made from there and the polls showed it changed zero minds. They like the East Room/Cross Hall and the Diplomatic Room. The East Room would be easier for hosting Republicans as an audience.

The Senate is set to vote Thursday on two different proposals to end the shutdown, one that was passed by the Democratic-controlled House and one built off Trump’s own proposal presented in a speech on Saturday. White House officials expect both bills will fail. But their hope is that once they do, Democrats will be more amenable to negotiations.

It appears that the White House is waiting on those votes before moving forward with negotiations.